Biosynthesis of bacterial glycogen: activator specificity of the adenosine diphosphate glucose pyrophosphorylases from the genus Rhodospirillum.

Abstract

The adenosine diphosphate (ADP) glucose pyrophosphorylases from Rhodospirillum fulvum, Rhodospirillum molischianum, and Rhodospirillum tenue were partially purified, and their kinetic properties were studied. The enzyme from the three organisms was found to be activated by pyruvate and thus was similar to the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme that had been previously studied (C. E. Furlong, and J. Preiss, J. Biol. Chem. 244:2539-2548, 1979). The enzymes from R. fulvum, R. molischianum, and R. tenue were also activated by oxamate, an analog of pyruvate. Other alpha-keto acids, alpha-ketobutyrate and hydroxypyruvate, activated to a smaller extent. The presence of pyruvate increased the apparent affinity for adenosine 5'-triphosphate and MgCl2 for all three enzymes. The R. molischianum enzyme has very little sensitivity to inhibition by adenosine 5'-monophosphate, ADP, or inorganic phosphate. However, R. tenue ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase is very sensitive to inhibition by adenosine 5'-monophosphate, and the R. fulvum enzyme is inhibited by ADP. Increasing pyruvate concentration reversed the inhibition caused by adenosine 5'-monophosphate or ADP. Since ADPglucose is the glycosyl donor for synthesis of glycogen, it is possible that in vivo glycogen synthesis is regulated by the concentration of pyruvate and, in the case of R. fulvum and R. tenue, by the ratio of pyruvate concentration to inhibitor concentration.

Cite this paper

@article{Preiss1981BiosynthesisOB, title={Biosynthesis of bacterial glycogen: activator specificity of the adenosine diphosphate glucose pyrophosphorylases from the genus Rhodospirillum.}, author={Judita Preiss and Elaine Greenberg}, journal={Journal of bacteriology}, year={1981}, volume={147 3}, pages={711-9} }