Biomechanics of predator–prey arms race in lion, zebra, cheetah and impala

@article{Wilson2018BiomechanicsOP,
  title={Biomechanics of predator–prey arms race in lion, zebra, cheetah and impala},
  author={A. Wilson and Tatjana M Hubel and S. Wilshin and J. Lowe and Maja Lorenc and Oliver P Dewhirst and Hattie Bartlam-Brooks and Rebecca A Diack and Emily Bennitt and K. A. Golabek and R. Woledge and J. W. Mcnutt and N. Curtin and T. G. West},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2018},
  volume={554},
  pages={183-188}
}
The fastest and most manoeuvrable terrestrial animals are found in savannah habitats, where predators chase and capture running prey. Hunt outcome and success rate are critical to survival, so both predator and prey should evolve to be faster and/or more manoeuvrable. Here we compare locomotor characteristics in two pursuit predator–prey pairs, lion–zebra and cheetah–impala, in their natural savannah habitat in Botswana. We show that although cheetahs and impalas were universally more athletic… Expand
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