Biomechanics and Energetics in Aquatic and Semiaquatic Mammals: Platypus to Whale*

@article{Fish2000BiomechanicsAE,
  title={Biomechanics and Energetics in Aquatic and Semiaquatic Mammals: Platypus to Whale*},
  author={Frank E. Fish},
  journal={Physiological and Biochemical Zoology},
  year={2000},
  volume={73},
  pages={683 - 698}
}
  • F. Fish
  • Published 1 November 2000
  • Environmental Science
  • Physiological and Biochemical Zoology
A variety of mammalian lineages have secondarily invaded the water. To locomote and thermoregulate in the aqueous medium, mammals developed a range of morphological, physiological, and behavioral adaptations. A distinct difference in the suite of adaptations, which affects energetics, is apparent between semiaquatic and fully aquatic mammals. Semiaquatic mammals swim by paddling, which is inefficient compared to the use of oscillating hydrofoils of aquatic mammals. Semiaquatic mammals swim at… 

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