Biomechanics: Independent evolution of running in vampire bats

@article{Riskin2005BiomechanicsIE,
  title={Biomechanics: Independent evolution of running in vampire bats},
  author={Daniel K. Riskin and John W. Hermanson},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={434},
  pages={292-292}
}
  • Daniel K. Riskin, John W. Hermanson
  • Published in Nature 2005
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Most tetrapods have retained terrestrial locomotion since it evolved in the Palaeozoic era, but bats have become so specialized for flight that they have almost lost the ability to manoeuvre on land at all. Vampire bats, which sneak up on their prey along the ground, are an important exception. Here we show that common vampire bats can also run by using a unique bounding gait, in which the forelimbs instead of the hindlimbs are recruited for force production as the wings are much more powerful… CONTINUE READING

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