Biology of anti-angiogenic therapy-induced thrombotic microangiopathy.

@article{Eremina2010BiologyOA,
  title={Biology of anti-angiogenic therapy-induced thrombotic microangiopathy.},
  author={Vera Eremina and Susan E Quaggin},
  journal={Seminars in nephrology},
  year={2010},
  volume={30 6},
  pages={
          582-90
        }
}
Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents are an important component in the treatment of many solid tumors. As the indications for these targeted therapies grow, the expected number of patients to receive these drugs will increase exponentially. Despite the great promise, serious toxicities may arise. Here, we discuss the incidence, pathogenesis, and management of proteinuria and renal insufficiency associated with this class of drugs. 

Citations

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  • American journal of medical case reports
  • 2019
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  • Nephrology, dialysis, transplantation : official publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
  • 2018
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