Biology and treatment of childhood T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

@article{Uckun1998BiologyAT,
  title={Biology and treatment of childhood T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia.},
  author={Fatih M. Uckun and Martha G. Sensel and Luhong Sun and Peter G. Steinherz and Michael e. Trigg and Nyla A. Heerema and Harland N. Sather and Gregory H. Reaman and Paul S. Gaynon},
  journal={Blood},
  year={1998},
  volume={91 3},
  pages={735-46}
}
ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA (ALL) is the most prevalent type of cancer, as well as the most common form of leukemia in children. 1 This lymphoid malignancy, manifested by the proliferation of lymphopoietic blast cells, represents a heterogeneous group of diseases that vary with respect to morphological, cytogenetic, and immunologic features of the transformed cells. Technical improvements in immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry together with the availability of numerous monoclonal… CONTINUE READING

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