Corpus ID: 90663714

Biology and Behavior of the Asian Needle Ant, Brachyponera chinensis

@inproceedings{Allen2017BiologyAB,
  title={Biology and Behavior of the Asian Needle Ant, Brachyponera chinensis},
  author={Hamilton Ross Allen},
  year={2017}
}
.................................................................................................................... ii DEDICATION ................................................................................................................ iv ACKNOWLEDGMENTS .............................................................................................. v LIST OF TABLES .......................................................................................................... ix LIST OF… Expand
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The finding of the new species P. nakasujii suggests that much remains undiscovered even in biologically fascinating and well-studied organisms. Expand
Seasonal occurrence of swarming activity and worker abundance of Pachycondyla chinensis (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).
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It is determined that P. chinensis began swarming in late May, peaked in mid-July and declined sharply by early August, and began declining in September, was inconsistent in October, and by November, workers were no longer present in pitfall traps. Expand
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The tribal and generic classification of the diverse ant subfamily Ponerinae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is revised to reflect recent molecular phylogenetic information and a reappraisal of ponerineExpand
Emergence of the Introduced Ant Pachycondyla chinensis (Formicidae: Ponerinae) as a Public Health Threat in the Southeastern United States
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Pachycondyla chinensis represents an emerging public health threat throughout its present range in the southeastern United States and because of reported adverse reactions to stings of P. chinensis, further studies on its ecology and medical and veterinary importance need to be undertaken. Expand
Use of termites, Reticulitermes virginicus, as a springboard in the invasive success of a predatory ant, Pachycondyla (=Brachyponera) chinensis
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The behavior of P. chinensis in the presence of termites increases their competitive abilities in natural areas where they have been introduced, and it is suggested that subterranean termites are critical for P.chinensis success in new habitats. Expand
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Propagule Pressure and Climate Contribute to the Displacement of Linepithema humile by Pachycondyla chinensis
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We review the results from a 20-year study of the spread of the invasive Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (MAYR, 1868), in a reserve in Northern California. Ecological studies show that ArgentineExpand
Climate Change May Boost the Invasion of the Asian Needle Ant
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The models suggest that the Asian needle ant (Pachycondyla chinensis) currently has a far greater potential distribution than its current exotic range, including large parts of the world land Mass, including Northeast America, Southeast Asia and Southeast America. Expand
Social structure and nestmate discrimination in two species of Brachyponera ants distributed in Japan
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Findings suggest that native populations of B. chinensis already possess some of the key characteristics shared by many invasive exotic ants in introduced ranges, such as stable polygyny, weak internest aggression and acceptance of non‐nestmates. Expand
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