Biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) - is there potential for genetic interventions in the Triticeae?

@article{Subbarao2009BiologicalNI,
  title={Biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) - is there potential for genetic interventions in the Triticeae?},
  author={Guntur Venkata Subbarao and Masahiro Kishii and Kazuhiko Nakahara and Takayuki Ishikawa and Tomohiro Ban and Hisashi Tsujimoto and Timothy S George and Wade L. Berry and C. Tom Hash and Osamu Ito},
  journal={Breeding Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={59},
  pages={529-545}
}
The natural ability of plants to release chemical substances from their roots that have a suppressing effect on nitrifier activity and soil nitrification, is termed ‘biological nitrification inhibition’ (BNI). Though nitrification is one of the critical processes in the nitrogen cycle, unrestricted and rapid nitrification in agricultural systems can result in major losses of nitrogen from the plant-soil system. This nitrogen loss is due to the leaching of nitrate out of the rooting zone and… Expand

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