Biological nitrification inhibition (BNI)—is it a widespread phenomenon?

@article{Subbarao2006BiologicalNI,
  title={Biological nitrification inhibition (BNI)—is it a widespread phenomenon?},
  author={G. Subbarao and M. Rond{\'o}n and O. Ito and T. Ishikawa and I. Rao and K. Nakahara and C. Lascano and W. Berry},
  journal={Plant and Soil},
  year={2006},
  volume={294},
  pages={5-18}
}
Regulating nitrification could be a key strategy in improving nitrogen (N) recovery and agronomic N-use efficiency in situations where the loss of N following nitrification is significant. A highly sensitive bioassay using recombinant luminescent Nitrosomonas europaea, has been developed that can detect and quantify the amount of nitrification inhibitors produced by plants (hereafter referred to as BNI activity). A number of species including tropical and temperate pastures, cereals and legumes… Expand

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