Biological markets: supply and demand determine the effect of partner choice in cooperation, mutualism and mating

@article{No2004BiologicalMS,
  title={Biological markets: supply and demand determine the effect of partner choice in cooperation, mutualism and mating},
  author={R. No{\"e} and P. Hammerstein},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={35},
  pages={1-11}
}
The formation of collaborating pairs by individuals belonging to two different classes occurs in the contexts of reproduction and intea-specific cooperation as well as of inter-specific mutualism. There is potential for partner choice and for competition for access to preferred partners in all three contexts. These selective forces have long been recognised as important in sexual selection, but their impact is not yet appreciated in cooperative and mutualistic systems. The formation of… Expand

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