Biological markers in osteoarthritis

@article{Rousseau2007BiologicalMI,
  title={Biological markers in osteoarthritis},
  author={J-C. Rousseau and Pierre Dominique Delmas},
  journal={Nature Clinical Practice Rheumatology},
  year={2007},
  volume={3},
  pages={346-356}
}
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive disorder characterized by destruction of articular cartilage and subchondral bone, and by synovial changes. The diagnosis of OA is generally based on clinical and radiographic changes, which occur fairly late during disease progression and have poor sensitivity for monitoring disease progression. Progression of joint damage is likely to result primarily from an imbalance between cartilage degradation and repair, so measuring markers of these processes would… 
Biological markers in osteoarthritis.
TLDR
The BIPED classification that appeared in 2006 for OA markers is used to describe the potential usage of a given marker and the combination of specific markers seems to improve the prediction of disease progression at the individual level.
Prognostic biomarkers in osteoarthritis
TLDR
Prognostic biomarkers may be used in clinical knee osteoarthritis to identify subgroups in whom the disease progresses at different rates to facilitate the understanding of the pathogenesis and allow us to differentiate phenotypes within a heterogeneous knee osteOarthritis population.
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TLDR
This review summarizes the data on the investigation of biochemical and genetic markers in OA and highlights the new biomarkers that are recently reported and their application and limitation in the management of OA.
Animal Models of Osteoarthritis
TLDR
The available species and models of OA are reviewed and their potential utility discussed and this approach represents a cornerstone for the development of new anti-OA therapeutic targets and drugs.
Applications of Proteomics to Osteoarthritis, a Musculoskeletal Disease Characterized by Aging
TLDR
The relevance and potential of proteomics for studying age-related musculoskeletal diseases such as OA are discussed and the contributions of key investigators in the field are reviewed.
Value of biomarkers in osteoarthritis: current status and perspectives
TLDR
Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation, and there are a number of promising candidates, notably urinary C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type II and serum cartilage oligomeric protein.
Contributions of inflammation and angiogenesis to structural damage and pain in osteoarthritis
TLDR
Data from animal studies indicates that conversion of acute inflammation to chronic inflammation may be due to the stimulation of angiogenesis, and these data provide evidence that synovitis contributes to joint pathology and pain behaviour in the rat MNX model of OA.
Biomarkers of (osteo)arthritis
  • A. Mobasheri, Y. Henrotin
  • Medicine
    Biomarkers : biochemical indicators of exposure, response, and susceptibility to chemicals
  • 2015
TLDR
This Special Issue of Biomarkers is dedicated to recent progress in the field of OA biomarkers and reviews the current state-of-the-art and discusses the utility of Oa biomarkers as diagnostic and prognostic tools.
Republished: Value of biomarkers in osteoarthritis: current status and perspectives
TLDR
Osteoarthritis affects the whole joint structure with progressive changes in cartilage, menisci, ligaments and subchondral bone, and synovial inflammation, and there are a number of promising candidates, notably urinary C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type II and serum cartilage oligomeric protein.
Biomarkers of Osteoarthritis: A Review of Recent Research Progress on Soluble Biochemical Markers, Published Patents and Areas for Future Development
TLDR
This review of recent progress in the area of OA biochemical marker research stimulates further research into OA biomarkers and contributes to the development of new and innovative tests for early disease diagnosis, facilitating individualised treatment and improving clinical outcome.
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