Biological control of locusts and grasshoppers.

@article{Lomer2001BiologicalCO,
  title={Biological control of locusts and grasshoppers.},
  author={Christopher J. Lomer and Roy P. Bateman and D. L. Johnson and Juergen Langewald and M. Thomas},
  journal={Annual review of entomology},
  year={2001},
  volume={46},
  pages={
          667-702
        }
}
Control of grasshoppers and locusts has traditionally relied on synthetic insecticides, and for emergency situations this is unlikely to change. However, a growing awareness of the environmental issues associated with acridid control as well as the high costs of emergency control are expanding the demand for biological control. In particular, preventive, integrated control strategies with early interventions will reduce the financial and environmental costs associated with large-scale plague… 
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TLDR
It is demonstrated, using novel population dynamic models containing measured estimates of horizontal transmission coefficients, that secondary cycling of the pathogen after a single spray application provides a biological substitute for chemical persistence.
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Successful development of a biological pesticide requires attention not only to the biological agent, but also to formulation, application, and the biology of the pest–pathogen interaction in the
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Locusts and grasshoppers regularly threaten agricultural production across large parts of the developed and developing worlds. Recent concerns over the health and environmental impacts of standard
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Development of strategies for the incorporation of biological pesticides into the integrated management of locusts and grasshoppers
TLDR
An evaluation of the utility of the manual destruction of egg pods leads to the conclusion that the possibility of importing egg parasitoids, such as Scelio parvicornis from Australia, into Africa should be considered.
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TLDR
Increased commercial interest in biological control is likely to accelerate the development of improved and more economical methods for the mass-production of microbial control agents.
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