Biological and biomedical implications of the co-evolution of pathogens and their hosts

@article{Woolhouse2002BiologicalAB,
  title={Biological and biomedical implications of the co-evolution of pathogens and their hosts},
  author={Mark E. J. Woolhouse and Joanne P. Webster and Esteban Domingo and Brian Charlesworth and Bruce R. Levin},
  journal={Nature Genetics},
  year={2002},
  volume={32},
  pages={569-577}
}
Co-evolution between host and pathogen is, in principle, a powerful determinant of the biology and genetics of infection and disease. Yet co-evolution has proven difficult to demonstrate rigorously in practice, and co-evolutionary thinking is only just beginning to inform medical or veterinary research in any meaningful way, even though it can have a major influence on how genetic variation in biomedically important traits is interpreted. Improving our understanding of the biomedical… Expand

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