Biological Sensitivity to Context

@article{Ellis2008BiologicalST,
  title={Biological Sensitivity to Context},
  author={Bruce J. Ellis and W. Thomas Boyce},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={2008},
  volume={17},
  pages={183 - 187}
}
  • B. Ellis, W. Boyce
  • Published 1 June 2008
  • Psychology
  • Current Directions in Psychological Science
Conventional views suggest that exaggerated biological reactivity to stress is a harmful vestige of an evolutionary past in which threats to survival were more prevalent and severe. Recent evidence, however, indicates that effects of high reactivity on behavior and health are bivalent rather than univalent in character, exerting both risk-augmenting and risk-protective effects depending on the context. These observations suggest that heightened stress reactivity may reflect increased biological… 
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Theoretical perspectives generate a novel hypothesis: that there is a curvilinear, U-shaped relation between early exposures to adversity and the development of stress-reactive profiles, with high reactivity phenotypes disproportionately emerging within both highly stressful and highly protected early social environments.
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