Biological Control in Agroecosystems

@article{Batra1982BiologicalCI,
  title={Biological Control in Agroecosystems},
  author={S. W. Batra},
  journal={Science},
  year={1982},
  volume={215},
  pages={134 - 139}
}
Living organisms are used as biological pest control agents in (i) classical biological control, primarily for permanent control of introduced perennial weed pests or introduced pests of perennial crops; (ii) augmentative biological control, for temporary control of native or introduced pests of annual crops grown in monoculture; and (iii) conservative or natural control, in which the agroecosystem is managed to maximize the effect of native or introduced biological control agents. The… Expand

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