Biogeography and Ecological Setting of Indian Ocean Hydrothermal Vents

@article{VanDover2001BiogeographyAE,
  title={Biogeography and Ecological Setting of Indian Ocean Hydrothermal Vents},
  author={Cindy L. Van Dover and Susan E. Humphris and Daniel Fornari and Colleen M. Cavanaugh and Robert Collier and Shana K Goffredi and Jun Hashimoto and Marvin D. Lilley and Anna-Louise Reysenbach and Timothy M. Shank and Karen L. Von Damm and Amy B. Banta and Robert M. Gallant and Dorothee G{\"o}tz and Darwin Green and J. Hall and T. L. Harmer and Luis Alberto Hurtado and P. Johnson and Zoe P McKiness and Carpenter Meredith and Eric James Crane Olson and Irvin L. Pan and Mary Turnipseed and Yong-Jin Won and Curtis Robert Young and Robert C. Vrijenhoek},
  journal={Science},
  year={2001},
  volume={294},
  pages={818 - 823}
}
Within the endemic invertebrate faunas of hydrothermal vents, five biogeographic provinces are recognized. Invertebrates at two Indian Ocean vent fields (Kairei and Edmond) belong to a sixth province, despite ecological settings and invertebrate-bacterial symbioses similar to those of both western Pacific and Atlantic vents. Most organisms found at these Indian Ocean vent fields have evolutionary affinities with western Pacific vent faunas, but a shrimp that ecologically dominates Indian Ocean… 
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Structure and Connectivity of Hydrothermal Vent Communities Along the Mid-Ocean Ridges in the West Indian Ocean: A Review
To date, 13 biologically active hydrothermal vent (HTV) fields have been described on the West Indian Ocean ridges. Knowledge of benthic communities of these vent ecosystems serves as scientific
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