Biogeographic distributions of neotropical trees reflect their directly measured drought tolerances

@inproceedings{EsquivelMuelbert2017BiogeographicDO,
  title={Biogeographic distributions of neotropical trees reflect their directly measured drought tolerances},
  author={Adriane Esquivel-Muelbert and David Galbraith and Kyle G. Dexter and Timothy R. Baker and Simon L. Lewis and Patrick Meir and Lucy Rowland and Antonio Carlos Lola Costa and Daniel C. Nepstad and Oliver L. Phillips},
  booktitle={Scientific Reports},
  year={2017}
}
High levels of species diversity hamper current understanding of how tropical forests may respond to environmental change. In the tropics, water availability is a leading driver of the diversity and distribution of tree species, suggesting that many tropical taxa may be physiologically incapable of tolerating dry conditions, and that their distributions along moisture gradients can be used to predict their drought tolerance. While this hypothesis has been explored at local and regional scales… CONTINUE READING
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