Biogeographic comparisons of marine algal polyphenolics: evidence against a latitudinal trend

@article{Targett2004BiogeographicCO,
  title={Biogeographic comparisons of marine algal polyphenolics: evidence against a latitudinal trend},
  author={Nancy McKeever Targett and Loren D. Coen and Anne A. Boettcher and Christopher E. Tanner},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={89},
  pages={464-470}
}
SummaryMarine allelochemicals generally are present in greater quantity and diversity in tropical than in temperate regions. Marine algal polyphenolics have been reported as an apparent exception to this biogeographic trend, with literature values for phenolic concentrations significantly higher in temperate than in tropical brown algae. In contrast, our results, the first reported for Caribbean brown algae (orders Dictyotales and Fucales), show that many species have high phenolic levels. In… 
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    Bulletin of environmental contamination and toxicology
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