Biogeographic ancestry, self-identified race, and admixture-phenotype associations in the Heart SCORE Study.

@article{Halder2012BiogeographicAS,
  title={Biogeographic ancestry, self-identified race, and admixture-phenotype associations in the Heart SCORE Study.},
  author={Indrani Halder and Kevin E. Kip and Suresh R. Mulukutla and Aryan N Aiyer and Oscar C. Marroquin and Gordon S. Huggins and Steven E. Reis},
  journal={American journal of epidemiology},
  year={2012},
  volume={176 2},
  pages={146-55}
}
Large epidemiologic studies examining differences in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profiles between European Americans and African Americans have exclusively used self-identified race (SIR) to classify individuals. Recent genetic epidemiology studies of some CVD risk factors have suggested that biogeographic ancestry (BGA) may be a better predictor of CVD risk than SIR. This hypothesis was investigated in 464 African Americans and 771 European Americans enrolled in the Heart… CONTINUE READING

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