Biogenic amines activate blood leukocytes via trace amine‐associated receptors TAAR1 and TAAR2

@article{Babusyte2013BiogenicAA,
  title={Biogenic amines activate blood leukocytes via trace amine‐associated receptors TAAR1 and TAAR2},
  author={Agne Babusyte and Matthias Kotthoff and Julia Fiedler and Dietmar Krautwurst},
  journal={Journal of Leukocyte Biology},
  year={2013},
  volume={93}
}
Certain biogenic amines, such as 2‐PEA, TYR, or T1AM, modulate blood pressure, cardiac function, brain monoaminergic systems, and olfaction‐guided behavior by specifically interacting with members of a group of rhodopsin‐like receptors, TAAR. A receptor that is absent from olfactory epithelia but had long been identified in the brain and a variety of peripheral tissues, TAAR1 has been found recently in blood B cells, suggesting a functional role of TAAR1 in these cells. With the present study… Expand
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