Biogenetic explanations and public acceptance of mental illness: Systematic review of population studies

@article{Angermeyer2011BiogeneticEA,
  title={Biogenetic explanations and public acceptance of mental illness: Systematic review of population studies},
  author={Matthias C. Angermeyer and Anita Holzinger and Mauro Giovanni Carta and Georg Schomerus},
  journal={British Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={2011},
  volume={199},
  pages={367 - 372}
}
Background Biological or genetic models of mental illness are commonly expected to increase tolerance towards people with mental illness, by reducing notions of responsibility and blame. Aims To investigate whether biogenetic causal attributions of mental illness among the general public are associated with more tolerant attitudes, whether such attributions are related to lower perceptions of guilt and responsibility, to what extent notions of responsibility are associated with rejection of… Expand
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