Biofilms as complex differentiated communities.

@article{Stoodley2002BiofilmsAC,
  title={Biofilms as complex differentiated communities.},
  author={Paul Stoodley and Karin Sauer and David Gwilym Davies and J. William Costerton},
  journal={Annual review of microbiology},
  year={2002},
  volume={56},
  pages={
          187-209
        }
}
Prokaryotic biofilms that predominate in a diverse range of ecosystems are often composed of highly structured multispecies communities. Within these communities metabolic activities are integrated, and developmental sequences, not unlike those of multicellular organisms, can be detected. These structural adaptations and interrelationships are made possible by the expression of sets of genes that result in phenotypes that differ profoundly from those of planktonically grown cells of the same… 

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