Biofeedback Treatment for Functional Anorectal Disorders: A Comprehensive Efficacy Review

@article{Palsson2004BiofeedbackTF,
  title={Biofeedback Treatment for Functional Anorectal Disorders: A Comprehensive Efficacy Review},
  author={Olafur S. Palsson and Steve Heymen and William E. Whitehead},
  journal={Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback},
  year={2004},
  volume={29},
  pages={153-174}
}
This review aimed to critically evaluate the literature on the efficacy of biofeedback for functional anorectal disorders, rate these biofeedback applications according to established guidelines, and make recommendations for this field based on the literature. The Medline and PsychInfo databases were searched to obtain all papers published from 1975 to 2003 that included the terms “biofeedback” and either “constipation,” “pelvic floor dyssynergia,” “fecal incontinence,” or “anorectal pain… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
Fecal incontinence affects 2% of adults in the United States. Biofeedback has been recommended for the treatment of fecal incontinence because uncontrolled studies over the past… Expand
ConditionsFecal Incontinence
InterventionBehavioral
Interventional Clinical Trial
Constipation affects 4% of adults in the United States (U.S.). An estimated half of constipated patients are unable to relax pelvic floor muscles during defecation, a type of… Expand
ConditionsConstipation
InterventionBehavioral, Drug
A randomized controlled trial of anorectal biofeedback for constipation
TLDR
While the sample was statistically underpowered, AB produced clinical improvements in constipation severity and QOL, and those without a childhood sexual/physical abuse history showed improvement on the MCS post-biofeedback. Expand
Efficacy of anorectal biofeedback in scleroderma patients with fecal incontinence: a case–control study
TLDR
Patients with scleroderma benefit from biofeedback therapy to the same extent as that achieved in patients with functional FI, and there are significant improvements in symptoms, physiology and QOL. Expand
Biofeedback for treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation in adults.
TLDR
Low or very low quality evidence is found that bio feedback is superior to oral diazepam, sham biofeedback and laxatives, and there is a lack of evidence as to whether any one method ofBiofeedback is more effective than any other method of biofeedbacks. Expand
The role of biofeedback in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders
TLDR
This Review provides a comprehensive overview of all potential therapeutic applications of biofeedback for functional constipation, fecal incontinence, functional anorectal pain, IBS, functional dyspepsia, and aerophagia. Expand
Biofeedback is an effective treatment for patients with dyssynergic defaecation.
TLDR
Biofeedback is an effective treatment for patients with dyssynergic defaecation and patients with chronic constipation not improved by fibre and laxatives should be referred to a tertiary centre with facilities for further anorectal physiological assessment. Expand
Biofeedback treatment of chronic constipation: myths and misconceptions
TLDR
Randomized controlled trials support the effectiveness of biofeedback therapy for severe, refractory constipation due to functional defecation disorders, and bio feedback remains the safest option to successfully manage this hard-to-treat subtype of constipation. Expand
Biofeedback therapy in fecal incontinence and constipation
TLDR
BFT for pelvic floor dyssynergia shows substantial specific therapeutic effect while BFT for incontinence is still lacking evidence for efficacy, however, in both conditions the mode of BFT seems to play a minor role. Expand
The Long-term Clinical Efficacy of Biofeedback Therapy for Patients With Constipation or Fecal Incontinence
TLDR
Symptom improvements after biofeedback therapy were disappointing in both the constipation and incontinence group, however, when the symptom improvements were classified as major or fair, the improvements continued for at least a year. Expand
Peer reviewed article sy stematic review: The management of constipation using phy sical ther apies incl uding biofeedback
TLDR
A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of biofeedback for functional constipation identified five trials that were of low methodological quality and, although the trials in general supportedBiofeedback treatment forfunctional constipation, the level of evidence for this recommendation was Grade C. Expand
Biofeedback for Fecal Incontinence: Short-Term Outcomes of 513 Consecutive Patients and Predictors of Successful Treatment
PurposeBiofeedback is well established as a treatment for fecal incontinence but little is known about factors that may be associated with its effectiveness. This study assessed short-term outcomes,Expand
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References

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Biofeedback Treatment of Fecal Incontinence: A Critical Review
PURPOSE The aims of this review are 1) to critically evaluate the literature on the efficacy of biofeedback treatment for fecal incontinence, 2) to compare different types of biofeedback, and 3) toExpand
Biofeedback Therapy in the Colon and Rectal Practice
TLDR
Biofeedback is a simple, cost-effective, and morbidity-free technique and remains an attractive option, especially considering the complexity of the functional disorders of the colon, rectum, anus, and pelvic floor. Expand
Prospective study of biofeedback retraining in patients with chronic idiopathic functional constipation.
TLDR
It is suggested that biofeedback has a long-term effect with no side effects, for the majority of patients with chronic idiopathic constipation unresponsive to traditional treatment. Expand
Can biofeedback therapy improve anorectal function in fecal incontinence?
TLDR
Biofeedback therapy is effective and improves objective and subjective parameters of anorectal function in patients with fecal incontinence and Customizing the number of sessions and providing periodic reinforcement may improve the success rate. Expand
Biofeedback training is useful in fecal incontinence but disappointing in constipation
TLDR
Biofeedback helped 73 percent of patients with fecal incontinent, and its use should be considered regardless of the cause or severity of incontinence or of results on initial manometry. Expand
Prospective study of biofeedback for treatment of constipation
TLDR
Biofeedback is not recommended in the management of constipation, with only two patients at the six-month follow-up had an improvement of greater than 50 percent in their symptoms. Expand
Biofeedback for the treatment of fecal incontinence
TLDR
Biofeedback improved continence at 6 months and at 30 months, suggesting that the initial good results may deteriorate over a long time and it could be useful to reinitiate biofeedback therapy in some patients. Expand
Efficiency of biofeedback therapy for chronic constipation in children.
TLDR
Biofeedback is an effective method of treatment for chronic constipation in children in short term and Therapeutic results are especially favorable in the recovery of abnormal anorectal dynamics and manometric parameters. Expand
Efficacy of biofeedback training in improving faecal incontinence and anorectal physiologic function.
TLDR
Anal pressures at rest and squeeze, the rectal distension volume that induced sustained inhibition of both the external and internal anal sphincter, and continence to rectally infused saline were significantly reduced in both groups of patients compared with controls. Expand
Electromyographic assessment of biofeedback training for fecal incontinence and chronic constipation
TLDR
Sphincter endurance and net strength, as measured by noninvasive electromyography, significantly improve following biofeedback therapy in both constipated and fecal incontinence patients. Expand
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