Biodiversity on land and in the sea

@article{Benton2001BiodiversityOL,
  title={Biodiversity on land and in the sea},
  author={Michael J. Benton},
  journal={Geological Journal},
  year={2001},
  volume={36}
}
  • M. Benton
  • Published 1 July 2001
  • Environmental Science
  • Geological Journal
Life on land today is as much as 25 times as diverse as life in the sea. Paradoxically, this extraordinarily high level of continental biodiversity has been achieved in a shorter time and it occupies a much smaller area of the Earth's surface than does marine biodiversity. Raw palaeontological data suggest very different models for the diversification of life on land and in the sea. The well‐studied marine fossil record appears to show evidence for an equilibrium model of diversification, with… 
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