Biodiversity decreases disease through predictable changes in host community competence

@article{Johnson2013BiodiversityDD,
  title={Biodiversity decreases disease through predictable changes in host community competence},
  author={Pieter T. J. Johnson and Daniel L. Preston and Jason T. Hoverman and Katherine L. D. Richgels},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2013},
  volume={494},
  pages={230-233}
}
Accelerating rates of species extinctions and disease emergence underscore the importance of understanding how changes in biodiversity affect disease outcomes. Over the past decade, a growing number of studies have reported negative correlations between host biodiversity and disease risk, prompting suggestions that biodiversity conservation could promote human and wildlife health. Yet the generality of the diversity–disease linkage remains conjectural, in part because empirical evidence of a… 
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