Biodiversity and terrestrial ecology of a mid-Cretaceous, high-latitude floodplain, Alexander Island, Antarctica

@article{FalconLang2001BiodiversityAT,
  title={Biodiversity and terrestrial ecology of a mid-Cretaceous, high-latitude floodplain, Alexander Island, Antarctica},
  author={H. Falcon-Lang and David J. Cantrill and Gary J. Nichols},
  journal={Journal of the Geological Society},
  year={2001},
  volume={158},
  pages={709 - 724}
}
The biodiversity and terrestrial ecology of the Late Albian Triton Point Formation (Fossil Bluff Group), Alexander Island, Antarctica is analysed to improve our understanding of polar biomes during the mid-Cretaceous thermal optimum. This formation was deposited on a high-latitude (75°S) floodplain and consists of two facies associations, a lower braided alluvial plain unit and an upper coastal meander-belt unit. Analysis of fossil plants in well exposed palaeosols reveals the existence of… 

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