Biodegradation of bisphenol A and its halogenated analogues by Cunninghamella elegans ATCC36112

@article{Keum2010BiodegradationOB,
  title={Biodegradation of bisphenol A and its halogenated analogues by Cunninghamella elegans ATCC36112},
  author={Young-Soo Keum and Hyeri Lee and Hee-Won Park and Jeong-Han Kim},
  journal={Biodegradation},
  year={2010},
  volume={21},
  pages={989-997}
}
Bisphenol A and its halogenated analogues are commonly used industrial chemicals with strong toxicological effects over many organisms. In this study, metabolic fate of bisphenol A and its halogenated analogues were evaluated with Cunninghamella elegans ATCC36112. Bisphenol A and related analogues were rapidly transformed into several metabolites by C. elegans within 2–4 days. Detailed analysis of metabolites reveals that both phase I and II metabolism occurred in C. elegans. Cytochrome P450… 
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