Biocompatibility and modification of the protein-based adhesive secreted by the Australian frog Notaden bennetti.

@article{Graham2010BiocompatibilityAM,
  title={Biocompatibility and modification of the protein-based adhesive secreted by the Australian frog Notaden bennetti.},
  author={Lloyd D. Graham and Stephen J. Danon and Graham Johnson and Carl Braybrook and Noel K. Hart and Russell J. Varley and Margaret D. M. Evans and Gail A. McFarland and Michael J. Tyler and Jerome Anthony Werkmeister and John A.M. Ramshaw},
  journal={Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A},
  year={2010},
  volume={93 2},
  pages={
          429-41
        }
}
When provoked, Notaden bennetti frogs secrete a proteinaceous exudate, which rapidly forms a tacky and elastic glue. This material has potential in biomedical applications. Cultured cells attached and proliferated well on glue-coated tissue culture polystyrene, but migrated somewhat slower than on uncoated surfaces. In organ culture, dissolved glue successfully adhered collagen-coated perfluoropolyether lenses to debrided bovine corneas and supported epithelial regrowth. Small pellets of glue… 
An Adhesive Secreted by Australian Frogs of the Genus Notaden
TLDR
The properties of the frog glue suggest that a recombinant mimic would have great potential for medical applications, and in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo studies suggest that the structural matrix of the set glue is highly biocompatible.
Characterisation of a skin secretion with adhesive properties in the ground frog Eupsophus vertebralis (Alsodidae)
TLDR
The sticky skin secretion released by the Patagonian frog Eupsophus vertebralis when stressed required a fast setting time to turn into strong adhesive, which worked well on synthetic and biological materials and suggest its biotechnological value for practical applications in industrial and medical sectors.
Salamanders on the bench – A biocompatibility study of salamander skin secretions in cell cultures
Nano/Biomimetic Tissue Adhesives Development: From Research to Clinical Application
TLDR
This work has attempted to introduce the fundamentals of wound healing along with the different types of bioadhesives, their properties, and clinical applications in a simple and illustrated comprehensive way.
Inspiration from the natural world: from bio-adhesives to bio-inspired adhesives
TLDR
This paper reviews recent discoveries in animal and plant bio-adhesives, and details the mechanisms used in several representative biological systems, and extends the review to include the fundamental principles functioning in each form of adhesion at the micro- and nanoscales.
Sealants (Adhesives) to Prevent Bleeding
TLDR
This chapter reviews the chemistry and applications of clinically available sealants and recent developments in this field.
Identification of Proteins Associated with Adhesive Prints from Holothuria dofleinii Cuvierian Tubules
TLDR
Examination of proteins from Holothuria dofleinii sourced from adhesive prints left on glass after the removal of adhered tubules suggests two of the seven proteins are novel and one is a C-type lectin, while—surprisingly—at least three of the other four are closely related to enzymes associated with the pentose phosphate cycle and glycolysis.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 23 REFERENCES
Characterization of a protein-based adhesive elastomer secreted by the Australian frog Notaden bennetti.
TLDR
In addition to compositional similarities with other biological adhesives and well-known elastomeric proteins, the circular dichroism spectrum of dissolved glue is almost identical to that for soluble elastin and electron and scanning probe microscopy images invite comparison with silk fibroins.
Proteinaceous adhesive secretions from insects, and in particular the egg attachment glue of Opodiphthera sp. moths.
Biochemical and electrophoretic screening of 29 adhesive secretions from Australian insects identified six types that appeared to consist largely of protein. Most were involved in terrestrial egg
Cell interactions with perfluoropolyether-based network copolymers.
TLDR
Results indicate that PFPE-based materials show a potential for use in the development of biomaterials in the ocular, vascular and orthopaedic areas.
Biomimetic Adhesive Polymers Based on Mussel Adhesive Proteins
TLDR
Although new biomimetic adhesives have the potential for impact in many areas of technology, one of the more compelling outlets for these materials is in healthcare delivery, which will be the focus of this chapter.
Functionalized silk-based biomaterials for bone formation.
TLDR
RGD covalently decorated silk appears to stimulate osteoblast-based mineralization in vitro and indicates that the proteins serve as suitable bone-inducing matrices.
Peptoid-containing collagen mimetics with cell binding activity.
TLDR
The discovery that triple-helical peptides containing the Gly-Pro-Nleu sequences interact with cells opens up new opportunities in the design of collagen mimetic biomaterials.
Meniscal Repair With a New Biological Glue: An Ex Vivo Study
TLDR
The frog glue demonstrated superior mechanical strength over the 2 other biological glues, which has great potential for further investigations and could be considered for meniscal repair in the future.
...
...