Biocompatibility and modification of the protein-based adhesive secreted by the Australian frog Notaden bennetti.

@article{Graham2010BiocompatibilityAM,
  title={Biocompatibility and modification of the protein-based adhesive secreted by the Australian frog Notaden bennetti.},
  author={L. Graham and S. Danon and G. Johnson and C. Braybrook and N. Hart and R. Varley and M. D. Evans and G. McFarland and M. Tyler and J. Werkmeister and J. Ramshaw},
  journal={Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A},
  year={2010},
  volume={93 2},
  pages={
          429-41
        }
}
When provoked, Notaden bennetti frogs secrete a proteinaceous exudate, which rapidly forms a tacky and elastic glue. This material has potential in biomedical applications. Cultured cells attached and proliferated well on glue-coated tissue culture polystyrene, but migrated somewhat slower than on uncoated surfaces. In organ culture, dissolved glue successfully adhered collagen-coated perfluoropolyether lenses to debrided bovine corneas and supported epithelial regrowth. Small pellets of glue… Expand
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