Biochemical markers of muscular damage

@inproceedings{Brancaccio2010BiochemicalMO,
  title={Biochemical markers of muscular damage},
  author={Paola Brancaccio and Giuseppe Lippi and Nicola Maffulli},
  booktitle={Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine},
  year={2010}
}
Abstract Muscle tissue may be damaged following intense prolonged training as a consequence of both metabolic and mechanical factors. Serum levels of skeletal muscle enzymes or proteins are markers of the functional status of muscle tissue, and vary widely in both pathological and physiological conditions. Creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, aldolase, myoglobin, troponin, aspartate aminotransferase, and carbonic anhydrase CAIII are the most useful serum markers of muscle injury, but… 

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