Biochemical and histopathological alterations in Biomphalaria glabrata due to co-infection by Angiostrongylus cantonensis and Echinostoma paraensei.

@article{dosSantosBonfim2014BiochemicalAH,
  title={Biochemical and histopathological alterations in Biomphalaria glabrata due to co-infection by Angiostrongylus cantonensis and Echinostoma paraensei.},
  author={Tatiane Cristina dos Santos Bonfim and Arnaldo Maldonado and Victor Menezes Tunholi and Vin{\'i}cius Menezes Tunholi-Alves and Marta J{\'u}lia Faro and Esther Maria Mota and Thatiane Cristina Barros da Silva and Jairo Pinheiro and Juberlan Silva Garcia},
  journal={Journal of invertebrate pathology},
  year={2014},
  volume={115},
  pages={
          80-5
        }
}
The effect of concurrent infection by Echinostoma paraensei and Angiostrongylus cantonensis on the activity of the enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and the concentration of total proteins, uric acid and urea in the hemolymph of Biomphalaria glabrata were investigated. Additionally, histopathological studies were conducted to better understand the dynamics of ontogenic development of both helminths in the host and the possible biochemical effects. Co… Expand
Biochemical profile of Achatina fulica (Mollusca: Gastropoda) after infection by different parasitic loads of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda, Metastrongylidae).
TLDR
There was a significant decrease in the concentration of total proteins in the exposed snails to 5000 or more larvae, accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of urea and uric acid in the hemolymph, suggesting higher rate of deamination of the amino acids. Expand
Evaluation of changes in the carbohydrate metabolism of Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 exposed to experimental coinfection by Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda) and Echinostoma paraensei (Trematoda).
TLDR
Results indicate that the intense energy demand resulting from the presence of parasites causes the host snail to accelerate the anaerobic degradation of carbohydrates to obtain energy, in an attempt to maintain homeostasis. Expand
Unveiling the oxidative metabolism of Achatina fulica (Mollusca: Gastropoda) experimentally infected to Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda: Metastrongylidae)
TLDR
The results indicate that A. cantonensis infection induces activation of the anaerobic metabolism of A. fulica, characterized not only by the accumulation of lactic acid, but also by a reduction in the pyruvic acid and oxalic acid contents in the hemolymph of the infected snails. Expand
The influence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda, Metastrongylidae) infection on the aerobic metabolism of Biomphalaria straminea and Biomphalaria tenagophila (Mollusca, Gastropoda).
TLDR
Results indicate that when infected, these snails are able to change their metabolic profile, suggesting a strategy to maintain their homeostatic balance. Expand
Biomphalaria glabrata infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis: proteomic changes in the snail host.
TLDR
Increase in phosphoglycerate mutase indicates an increase in glycolysis, possible to compensate the increase in energetic needs, and there is a decrease in glycogen reserves, particularly in the gonad - digestive gland complex. Expand
Biological and histological changes in reproductive patterns of Biomphalaria glabrata experimentally co-infected by Echinostoma paraensei and Angiostrongylus cantonensis.
TLDR
The reproductive and histological changes of Biomphalaria glabrata experimentally co-infected with Echinostoma paraensei and Angiostrongylus cantonensis showed that presence of both parasites in the reproductive organs was associated with tissue damages. Expand
Assessment of the experimental infection by Echinostoma paraensei (Lie & Basch, 1967) (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) in two Biomphalaria tenagophila (D’Orbigny, 1835) (Gastropoda: Planorbidae) isolates resistant and susceptible to Schistosoma mansoni (Sambon, 1907) (Trematoda: Schistosomatidae)
TLDR
The results demonstrate different degrees of compatibility for the two B. tenagophila isolates when infected with E. paraensei, and may contribute to studies about host-parasite relationships. Expand
Bulimulus tenuissimus (mollusca) as a new potential host of Angiostrogylus cantonensis (nematoda), a histological and metabolic study.
TLDR
The results reveal that B. tenuissimus is a robust host, which can live with the developing larvae of A. cantonensis and overcome the metabolic damages resulting from parasitism. Expand
Susceptibility of Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to concomitant infection with Angiostrongylus costaricensis and Schistosoma mansoni.
TLDR
The concomitant infection of Biomphalaria glabrata with Schistosoma mansoni and A. costaricensis proved to be very harmful to B. glabRata, causing extensive mortality of molluscs, reduced pre-patent period to release cercariae and greater recovery of L3 A.costaricense larvae. Expand
Comparative pattern of growth and development of Echinostoma paraensei (Digenea: Echinostomatidae) in hamster and Wistar rat using light and confocal laser scanning microscopy.
TLDR
This is the first appointment demonstrating that low permissiveness influences the reproductive system of echinostome since the immature stages of development, confirming golden hamster as a permissive host, whereas Wistar rat is less permissive hosts. Expand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 33 REFERENCES
Biochemical profile of Biomphalaria glabrata (Mollusca: Gastropoda) after infection by Echinostoma paraensei (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae)
TLDR
The higher ALT activity in the hemolymph of the snails after infection with 50 miracidia suggests highest energetic requirement in these snails in relation to snails exposed to five miracidia, and suggests an increase in the use of total proteins, since there was increased formation of nitrogenous catabolites. Expand
Effects of infection by larvae of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematoda, Metastrongylidae) on the metabolism of the experimental intermediate host Biomphalaria glabrata.
TLDR
An increase in the protein metabolism of the infected snails, since there was an increase in nitrogen catabolites such as urea, suggesting that in this model the infection induces proteolysis and inversion of the excretion pattern of theinfected snails. Expand
Aerobic to anaerobic transition in Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818) infected with different miracidial doses of Echinostoma paraensei (Lie and Basch, 1967) by high-performance liquid chromatography.
TLDR
The infection by both miracidial doses resulted in an increase of oxalic and lactic acid levels, as well as in a decline of piruvic and succinic acid levels in B. glabrata, thus explaining the reduction of the oxidative decarboxylation rate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and acceleration of the anaerobic degradation of carbohydrates in the snails, through lactic fermentation. Expand
Changes in the calcium metabolism of Biomphalaria glabrata experimentally infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis.
TLDR
Morphological changes in the digestive gland of infected snails were observed, confirming the role of this ion as an important element in the parasite encapsulation process. Expand
Physiological changes in Lymnaea columella (Say, 1817) (Mollusca, Gastropoda) in response to Echinostoma paraensei Lie and Basch, 1967 (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) infection
The physiological interaction between the digenean Echinostoma paraensei larvae and the intermediate snail host Lymnaea columella was studied. The carbohydrate content was significantly altered inExpand
Alterations in Biomphalaria glabrata plasma induced by infection with the digenetic trematode Echinostoma paraensei.
TLDR
Standard protein assays indicated an increase in total protein content of plasma samples from snails infected for 2-60 days, with significant increases noted at 4, 8, and 30 days. Expand
The Biology of the intestinal trematode Echinostoma caproni.
TLDR
The biology of the intestinal trematode, Echinostoma cuproni, is introduced and it is concluded that this organism is an exceptionally fine model for various studies in parasitology. Expand
The Invasion of Helminth Eggs by Chytridiacean Fungi.
TLDR
Two fungi, Catenaria anguillulae Sorokin and Rhizophidium carpophilum Zopf, which were found parasitic on the eggs of Dibothriocephalus latus in the Helminthology Department in March, 1927 are described and an account is given of some experimental work carried out with a view to determining the possibility of employing such parasites as a control measure in helminthiasis. Expand
The giant African snail Achatina fulica as natural intermediate host of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Pernambuco, northeast Brazil.
TLDR
If A. fulica may act as intermediate host of A. cantonensis at the peridomiciliary areas of a patient's house from state of Pernambuco (PE), who was diagnosed with eosinophilic meningitis and a history of ingesting raw molluscs is assessed. Expand
Eurytrema coelomaticum (Digenea, Dicrocoeliidae): the effect of infection on carbohydrate contents of its intermediate snail host, Bradybaena similaris (Gastropoda, Xanthonychidae)
TLDR
The interface Eurytrema coelomaticum/Bradybaena similaris was studied and it is proposed that the sporocysts absorb glucose directly from the hemolymph. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...