Bioceramics: From Concept to Clinic

@article{Hench1991BioceramicsFC,
  title={Bioceramics: From Concept to Clinic},
  author={Larry L. Hench},
  journal={Journal of the American Ceramic Society},
  year={1991},
  volume={74},
  pages={1487-1510}
}
  • L. Hench
  • Published 1991
  • Materials Science
  • Journal of the American Ceramic Society
Ceramics used for the repair and reconstruction of diseased or damaged parts of the musculo-skeletal system, termed bioceramics, may be bioinert (alumina, zirconia), resorbable (tricalcium phosphate), bioactive (hydroxyapatite, bioactive glasses, and glass-ceramics), or porous for tissue ingrowth (hydroxyapatite-coated metals, alumina). Applications include replacements for hips, knees, teeth, tendons, and ligaments and repair for periodontal disease, maxillofacial reconstruction, augmentation… Expand

Paper Mentions

News Article
Calcium Orthophosphate Bioceramics
Ceramics used for the repair and reconstruction of diseased or damaged parts of the musculo-skeletal system, termed bioceramics, can be bioinert, bioresorbable and bioactive, as well as porous forExpand
Chemical durability of alumina and selected glasses in simulated body fluid: effect of composition and surface abrasion.
  • M. Bengisu, E. Yilmaz
  • Materials Science, Medicine
  • Advances in experimental medicine and biology
  • 2004
TLDR
45S5 Bioglass® is the first commercialized glass with such features, and commonly accepted that the prerequisite for glasses and glass-ceramics to chemically attach to bone is the formation of a hydroxycarbonate apatite (HCA) layer. Expand
Bioceramics—A New Era
In the last few decades with the introduction of bioceramics, a special class of ceramics to perform tailored functional/biological/chemical activities in living systems, treatment procedure throughExpand
Ceramics in Bone Grafts and Coated Implants
Bioceramics is a class of materials that is used for repairing or replacing damaged bone tissues. Depending on the application, bioceramics can directly interact with the surrounding tissue, eitherExpand
Fabrication of Macroporous Glass-Ceramic Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering
  • 2014
Bone replacements are frequently required to substitute damaged tissue due to any trauma, disease or surgery. Some of the therapies are employed in order to solve these problems by the using ofExpand
Bone reconstruction: from bioceramics to tissue engineering
  • A. el-Ghannam
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Expert review of medical devices
  • 2005
TLDR
The synthesis of a new generation of biomaterials that can specifically serve as tissue engineering scaffolds for drug and cell delivery is needed and nanotechnology can provide an alternative way of processing porous bioceramics with high mechanical strength and enhanced bioactivity and resorbability. Expand
Use of bioactive glasses as bone substitutes in orthopaedics and traumatology
Bioactive glasses (BGs) are biomaterials investigated and suggested for bone replacement in the past 40 years. Its advantages include nontoxicity, biocompatibility, bioactivity, and bactericideExpand
Bioactive ceramics: from bone grafts to tissue engineering
Bioactive ceramics bond directly with living tissues when implanted. For this reason they have been profusely investigated as biomaterials. The first synthetic bioactive materials were specificExpand
Handbook of Bioceramics and Biocomposites
Bioceramics is a relatively new field; it did not exist until the beginning of 1970, when these materials were shown to restore osteoarticular and dental functions, as well as act as a replacementExpand
Bioceramic Applications: The Case of Dentistry and Orthopedics
The use of ceramic materials in the field of biomaterials is rapidly expanding. Biomaterials are a preferred market for ceramics due to their chemical inertia and high hardness, compared toExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 88 REFERENCES
The interface of various glasses and glass ceramics with a bony implantation bed.
  • U. Gross, V. Strunz
  • Materials Science, Medicine
  • Journal of biomedical materials research
  • 1985
TLDR
A comparison is made between the reactions of skeletal tissues to various glasses, glass-ceramics and enamels, and it is shown that the solubility of the glasses cannot directly be related to the reactivity and the resulting bone bonding. Expand
Tissue reaction to three ceramics of porous and non-porous structures.
TLDR
In this investigation, ceramics were studied to determine their role as rigid, abrasive implants in soft, living tissue and the absence of inflammatory cells and the normal morphology and organization of the cells present around all types of implants tested. Expand
Effect of hydroxyapatite impregnation on skeletal bonding of porous coated implants.
TLDR
Microscopical examination reveals that the apparent stimulation of bone ingrowth into the surface pores of the implant is the reason for the increased rate of bond formation, and weight bearing might be allowed much earlier, thus reducing the recuperation period. Expand
The anchoring of glass ceramics of different solubility in the femur of the rat.
  • U. Gross, V. Strunz
  • Materials Science, Medicine
  • Journal of biomedical materials research
  • 1980
TLDR
The dynamics of the events at the interface indicate a disturbance of the transformation of chondroid cells into osteoblasts and of the mineralization of osteoid in pathophysiologic processes during bone healing or bone regeneration. Expand
Tissue ingrowth of Replamineform implants.
TLDR
The Replamineform process, a new technique for the fabrication of porous hard tissue implant materials which replicates the skeletal configuration of certain marine invertebrates, was used to manufacture 1 cm long by 0.5 cm diam cylinders, and new bone was found to grow into the pores of these materials and become normally mineralized. Expand
A new glass-ceramic for bone replacement: evaluation of its bonding to bone tissue.
TLDR
The new glass-ceramic showed tight bonding to bone comparable with dense hydroxyapatite, and in 25 weeks its load was 70% of that of bone tissue. Expand
Replamineform porous biomaterials for hard tissue implant applications.
TLDR
Experimental results up to now clearly demonstrate the superiority of microstructures imparted to metals, ceramics, and polymers with the Replamineform process. Expand
Direct chemical bond of bioactive glass-ceramic materials to bone and muscle.
The objective of this research is to achieve direct chemical bonding of structurally strong implant materials with hard and soft tissues. This objective has been achieved through the development of aExpand
Interface reactions between machinable bioactive glass-ceramics and bone.
A new biomaterial for bone substitution, a "machinable bioactive glass-ceramic" has been developed. The material contains two main crystal phases, mica and apatite, and is therefore machinable andExpand
Novel Methods for Clinical Applications of Bioactive Ceramics
TLDR
This work has attempted some novel methods for clinical applications of bioactive ceramics and their results are reported here. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...