Biobehavioral treatment of essential hypertension: A group outcome study

@article{Fahrion1986BiobehavioralTO,
  title={Biobehavioral treatment of essential hypertension: A group outcome study},
  author={Steven L Fahrion and P Norris and Alynce Green and Edward Green and C E Snarr},
  journal={Biofeedback and Self-regulation},
  year={1986},
  volume={11},
  pages={257-277}
}
In a group outcome and follow-up study of 77 patients with essential hypertension, significant reductions were seen in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) and in hypotensive medication requirement. A multimodality biobehavioral treatment was used which included biofeedback-assisted training techniques aimed at teaching self-regulation of vasodilation in the hands and feet. Of the 54 medicated patients, 58% were able to eliminate hypotensive medication while at the same time reducing BP… Expand
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Five patients with documented histories of essential hypertension of at least ten years' duration participated in a triphasic study of training to control systolic blood pressure (SBP), finding evidence of retained SBP control. Expand
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