Bioavailability of chromium(III)-supplements in rats and humans

@article{Laschinsky2012BioavailabilityOC,
  title={Bioavailability of chromium(III)-supplements in rats and humans},
  author={Niels Laschinsky and Karin Kottwitz and Barbara Freund and Bernd Dresow and Roland Fischer and Peter Br{\o}nnum Nielsen},
  journal={BioMetals},
  year={2012},
  volume={25},
  pages={1051-1060}
}
Chromium(III) is long regarded as essential trace element but the biochemical function and even basic transport ways in the body are still unclear. For a more rational discussion on beneficial as well as toxic effects of Cr(III), we re-investigated the bioavailability of the most important oral Cr supplements by using radiolabeled compounds and whole-body-counting in rats and in the first time also in humans. The apparent absorption of 51Cr(III) from Cr-picolinate, Cr-nicotinate, Cr… 

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