Bioacoustics: Only male fin whales sing loud songs

@article{Croll2002BioacousticsOM,
  title={Bioacoustics: Only male fin whales sing loud songs},
  author={Donald A. Croll and Christopher W. Clark and Alejandro Acevedo and Bernie R. Tershy and Sergio Flores and Jason Gedamke and Jorge Urb{\'a}n},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2002},
  volume={417},
  pages={809-809}
}
The low-frequency vocalizations of fin and blue whales are the most powerful and ubiquitous biological sounds in the ocean. Here we combine acoustic localization and molecular techniques to show that, in fin whales, only males produce these vocalizations. This finding indicates that they may function as male breeding displays, and will help to focus concern on the impact of human-generated low-frequency sounds on recovering whale populations. 
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