Bioaccumulation and harmful effects of microcystin-LR in the aquatic plants Lemna minor and Wolffia arrhiza and the filamentous alga Chladophora fracta.

@article{Mitrovic2005BioaccumulationAH,
  title={Bioaccumulation and harmful effects of microcystin-LR in the aquatic plants Lemna minor and Wolffia arrhiza and the filamentous alga Chladophora fracta.},
  author={Simon M. Mitrovic and Orla Allis and Ambrose Furey and Kevin J. James},
  journal={Ecotoxicology and environmental safety},
  year={2005},
  volume={61 3},
  pages={
          345-52
        }
}
Bioaccumulation of microcystin and its oxidative stress in the apple (Malus pumila)
TLDR
The results showed that the growth and proliferation of M. pumila shoots in vitro decreased markedly after exposure to microcystins above 0.3 μg/ml, and the activity of peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) increased significantly after 14 days of exposure.
Microcystin-LR, a cyanobacterial toxin, induces growth inhibition and histological alterations in common reed (Phragmites australis) plants regenerated from embryogenic calli.
TLDR
The data suggest that microcystin-LR, a cyanotoxin, induced developmental and histological alterations leading to growth inhibition of reed, and the induced harms have an impact on understanding reed decay in eutrophic fresh waters.
Phytotoxic effects of cyanobacteria extract on Lemna minor and Myriophyllum spicatum phyto‐tolerance and superoxide dismutase activity
TLDR
The result indicated that M. spicatum was more tolerant to microcystins than L. minor and the induced SOD activity may contribute to the tolerance.
The Removal of Cyanobacterial Hepatotoxin [Dha7] Microcystin-LR via Bioaccumulation in Water Lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L.)
TLDR
Removal by P. stratiotes (with 0.5 and 1.0 mg/L of the toxin) was faster and greater in static systems than in continuous flow systems, whereas in the continuous flow system, the plant root tissue accumulated the toxin up to a concentration of 0.0041 ng/mg wet wt.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 52 REFERENCES
Influence of microcystin-RR on growth and photosynthetic capacity of the duckweed Lemna minor L.
TLDR
The maximum electron transport rate as an indicator of photosynthetic capacity was reduced up to 16 % compared to the values obtained from control plants and the contents of chlorophyll a, b and the total amount of carotenoids were significantly reduced by more than 50 %.
Effects of the cyanobacterial toxin microcystin‐LR on detoxication enzymes in aquatic plants
TLDR
The results indicate a detoxication pathway for microcystin‐LR in aquatic plants in aquatic animals and plants.
Investigations into the inhibitory effects of microcystins on plant growth, and the toxicity of plant tissues following exposure.
Toxicity of microcystin-LR, isolated from Microcystis aeruginosa, against various insect species.
  • J. Delaney, R. Wilkins
  • Biology
    Toxicon : official journal of the International Society on Toxinology
  • 1995
Uptake, effects, and metabolism of cyanobacterial toxins in the emergent reed plant Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex steud
TLDR
The commonly occurring cyanobacterial toxin microcystin‐LR was rapidly taken up by the emergent reed plant Phragmites australis with clear distribution in the different cormus parts of the plant, providing the first evidence for the uptake and metabolism of cyanob bacterial toxins by an emergent aquatic macrophyte.
Possible allelopathic effects of cyanotoxins, with reference to microcystin‐LR, in aquatic ecosystems
TLDR
A well‐known cyanobacterial secondary metabolite, microcystin‐LR, was tested for its allelopathic power on aquatic macrophytes, resulting in growth inhibition, reduction in photosynthetic oxygen production, and changes in pigment pattern, showing that microcyStin‐ LR has a possible role as an allelopathy infochemical.
Pathological and biochemical characterization of microcystin-induced hepatopancreas and kidney damage in carp (Cyprinus carpio).
TLDR
The present data demonstrate that, in comparison to the pathological events in salmonids exposed to MC, the pathology in carp develops rapidly and at lower toxin concentrations, this is most likely due to a more efficient uptake of toxin, while the mechanism of cell death is primarily apoptosis.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...