Bilingualism, dementia and the tale of many variables: Why we need to move beyond the Western World. Commentary on Lawton et al. (2015) and Fuller-Thomson (2015)

@article{Bak2016BilingualismDA,
  title={Bilingualism, dementia and the tale of many variables: Why we need to move beyond the Western World. Commentary on Lawton et al. (2015) and Fuller-Thomson (2015)},
  author={Thomas H Bak and Suvarna Alladi},
  journal={Cortex},
  year={2016},
  volume={74},
  pages={315-317}
}
The question whether bilingualism can affect cognitive functions and delay the onset of dementia is a controversial one. We comment on a recent paper, which found no significant differences in the onset of dementia betweenmonoand bilingual subjects (Lawton, Gasquoine, & Weimer, 2015) and a subsequent commentary calling into question the validity of previous studies reporting such a difference (Fuller-Thomson, 2015). We focus on the contentious issue of confounding variables, central to both… CONTINUE READING
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