Bigger weights may not beget bigger muscles: evidence from acute muscle protein synthetic responses after resistance exercise.

@article{Burd2012BiggerWM,
  title={Bigger weights may not beget bigger muscles: evidence from acute muscle protein synthetic responses after resistance exercise.},
  author={N. Burd and C. Mitchell and T. Churchward-Venne and Stuart M Phillips},
  journal={Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme},
  year={2012},
  volume={37 3},
  pages={
          551-4
        }
}
  • N. Burd, C. Mitchell, +1 author Stuart M Phillips
  • Published 2012
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme
It is often recommended that heavier training intensities (∼70%-80% of maximal strength) be lifted to maximize muscle growth. However, we have reported that intensities as low as 30% of maximum strength, when lifted to volitional fatigue, are equally effective at stimulating muscle protein synthesis rates during resistance exercise recovery. This paper discusses the idea that high-intensity contractions are not the exclusive driver of resistance exercise-induced changes in muscle protein… Expand
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Is There a Minimum Intensity Threshold for Resistance Training-Induced Hypertrophic Adaptations?
TLDR
Current research indicates that low-load exercise can indeed promote increases in muscle growth in untrained subjects, and that these gains may be functionally, metabolically, and/or aesthetically meaningful, whether hypertrophic adaptations can equal that achieved with higher intensity resistance exercise. Expand
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