Big data’s end run around anonymity and consent

@inproceedings{Barocas2014BigDE,
  title={Big data’s end run around anonymity and consent},
  author={Solon Barocas and Helen Nissenbaum},
  year={2014}
}
Introduction Big data promises to deliver analytic insights that will add to the stock of scientific and social scientific knowledge, significantly improve decision making in both the public and private sector, and greatly enhance individual self-knowledge and understanding. They have already led to entirely new classes of goods and services, many of which have been embraced enthusiastically by institutions and individuals alike. And yet, where these data commit to record details about human… 
Open Data, Privacy, and Fair Information Principles: Towards a Balancing Framework
Open data are held to contribute to a wide variety of social and political goals, including strengthening transparency, public participation and democratic accountability, promoting economic growth
Citizen Data and Trust in Official Statistics
Many, if not most, big data are connected to the lives of citizens: their movements, opinions, and relations. Arguably big data and citizens are inseparable: from smartphones, meters, fridges and
Big Data and the Future for Privacy
TLDR
It is argued that privacy in the authors' big data future can and must be secured in a variety of ways, and human values rather than privacy for privacy’s sake should animate their information rules.
A Precautionary Approach to Big Data Privacy
TLDR
The thesis is that the problem of “what to do about re-identification” unravels once the authors stop looking for a one-size-fits-all solution, and each of the six cases is considered a solution that is tailored, yet principled.
Privacy exchanges: restoring consent in privacy self-management
TLDR
It is concluded that that accepting big data companies’ privacy policies falls short of the disclosure and understanding requirements for informed consent.
Big Data, Ethics and Religion: New Questions from a New Science
TLDR
It is urged that theology and data science might engage in mutually-beneficial dialogue and some explorations of the ways in which insights from religious and theological perspectives might be valuable are suggested.
Recovering the History of Informed Consent for Data Science and Internet Industry Research Ethics
TLDR
Against any easy dismissal, insights from the history of informed consent as it developed from the late 19th century to today are recovered and it is shown how informed consent is not a fixed or monolithic concept that should be abandoned in view of new data-intensive and technological practices.
The Power Over Private Information in Big Data-Society: Power Structures of User-generated Data Manifested by Privacy and Data Policies
TLDR
This study shows that power in the policies of social media services is manifested by uncertainties, the users’ lack of control and influence and the social media companies' lack of transparency.
The Consent Paradox: Accounting for the Prominent Role of Consent in Data Protection
TLDR
The debate on consent in the scholarly literature in general, and among German data protection professionals in particular, is analyzed, showing that it is a focus on the informed individual that keeps the concept of consent in place.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 143 REFERENCES
Big Data: The End of Privacy or a New Beginning?
TLDR
It is argued that this Regulation relies too heavily on the discredited informed choice model, and therefore fails to fully engage with the coming big data tsunami, and reform efforts alone will prove inadequate.
Judged by the Tin Man: Individual Rights in the Age of Big Data
TLDR
It is argued that the focus on the machine is a distraction from the debate surrounding data driven ethical dilemmas, such as privacy, fairness and discrimination, and policymakers should seek to devise agreed-upon guidelines for ethical data analysis and profiling.
Introduction: Privacy Self-Management and the Consent Dilemma
TLDR
The goal of this bundle of rights is to provide people with control over their personal data, and through this control people can decide for themselves how to weigh the costs and benefits of the collection, use, or disclosure of their information.
A Contextual Approach to Privacy Online
TLDR
In developing this approach, the paper warns that the current bias in conceiving of the Net as a predominantly commercial enterprise seriously limits the privacy agenda, and proposes an alternative approach, rooted in the theory of contextual integrity.
Big Data and Due Process: Toward a Framework to Redress Predictive Privacy Harms
TLDR
It is argued that individuals who are privately and often secretly “judged” by big data should have similar rights to those judged by the courts with respect to how their personal data has been used in such adjudications, and analogizes a system of regulation that would provide such rights against private big data actors.
Big Data and Its Exclusions
TLDR
This essay argues that a new "data antisubordination" doctrine may be needed because big data poses a unique threat to equality, not just privacy.
Privacy Self-Management and the Consent Dilemma
TLDR
In this Article, several ways privacy law can grapple with the consent dilemma and move beyond relying too heavily on privacy self-management are proposed.
It's Not Privacy, and It's Not Fair
TLDR
Today, the creation and consequences of some classification systems, from determination of tax-exempt status to predictive analytics in health insurance, from targeting for surveillance to systems for online behavioral advertising, are under scrutiny by consumer and data protection regulators.
Fool's Gold: an Illustrated Critique of Differential Privacy
TLDR
Policymakers and data stewards will have to rely on a mix of approaches: perhaps differential privacy where it is well-suited to the task, and other disclosure prevention techniques in the great majority of situations where it isn’t.
On Notice: The Trouble with Notice and Consent
TLDR
It is concluded that even an opt-in regime in online behavioral advertising would lack legitimacy, due to the confusing disconnect between the privacy policies of online publishers and the tracking and targeting third parties with whom they contract.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...