Big-bodied males help us recognize that females have big pelves.

@article{Tague2005BigbodiedMH,
  title={Big-bodied males help us recognize that females have big pelves.},
  author={Robert G Tague},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={2005},
  volume={127 4},
  pages={392-405}
}
  • Robert G Tague
  • Published 2005 in American journal of physical anthropology
Schultz ([1949] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 7:401-424) presented a conundrum: among primates, sexual dimorphism of the pelvis is a developmental adjunct to dimorphism in other aspects of the body, albeit in the converse direction. Among species in which males are larger than females in body size, females are larger than males in some pelvic dimensions; species with little sexual dimorphism in nonpelvic size show little pelvic dimorphism. Obstetrical difficulty does not explain this relationship… CONTINUE READING

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