Bidi smoking and oral cancer: A meta‐analysis

@article{Rahman2003BidiSA,
  title={Bidi smoking and oral cancer: A meta‐analysis},
  author={Mahbubur Rahman and J. Sakamoto and T. Fukui},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={2003},
  volume={106}
}
Several epidemiological studies suggest that bidi smoking increases the risk of oral cancer. No systematic review, however, has been reported to examine how consistent the evidence is across the studies. We undertook a meta‐analysis of epidemiological studies investigating the relationship between bidi smoking and oral cancer. Primary studies were identified through a computerized literature search of Medline. Articles abstracted were all epidemiological studies published as original articles… Expand
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Risk of oral cancer associated with gutka and other tobacco products: a hospital-based case-control study.
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The study provided strong evidence that gutka, supari, chewing tobacco, betel quid, bidi and alcohol are independent risk factors for oral cancer. Expand
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Interaction of Alcohol Use and Specific Types of Smoking on the Development of Oral Cancer
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