Bias in studies of parental self-reported occupational exposure and childhood cancer.

@article{Schz2003BiasIS,
  title={Bias in studies of parental self-reported occupational exposure and childhood cancer.},
  author={Joachim Sch{\"u}z and Logan G. Spector and Julie A. Ross},
  journal={American journal of epidemiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={158 7},
  pages={
          710-6
        }
}
Several case-control studies have demonstrated positive associations between parental occupational exposures and childhood cancer. However, an overestimation of risk estimates due to recall bias is of concern. The magnitude and nature of this bias were explored using data from a German case-control study on childhood leukemia conducted between 1992 and 1997. A moderate overreporting of occupational exposures by fathers was observed, particularly for the prenatal period. Overreporting was most… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

Paternal occupational exposure to pesticides and risk of neuroblastoma among children: a meta-analysis
TLDR
Findings from current published studies do not support an association between paternal occupational pesticide exposure and childhood neuroblastoma.
Parental occupational exposure to benzene and the risk of childhood cancer: A census-based cohort study.
Case–control study of paternal occupational exposures and childhood lymphoma in Great Britain, 1962–2010
TLDR
This study provides no support for previous suggestions of an association between childhood lymphoma and paternal occupational exposure to pesticides, solvents/hydrocarbons or infections potentially transmitted by father’s social contacts.
The UK Childhood Cancer Study: maternal occupational exposures and childhood leukaemia and lymphoma.
TLDR
Refinement of exposure assessment revealed misclassification of self-reported exposures and data quality influenced risk assessment, which must invoke caution in the interpretation of risks reliant on self- reported occupational data.
Childhood Cancer and Social Contact: the Role of Paternal Occupation (United Kingdom)*
TLDR
The analyses of paternal occupational histories do not support the suggested association between high levels of maternal occupational social contact and an increased risk of childhood leukaemia, but the role of participation bias should not be discounted.
Childhood leukaemia and parental occupational exposure to pesticides: a systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
The strongest evidence of an increased risk of childhood leukaemia comes from studies with maternal occupational exposure to pesticides, and the need to rely more on studies that clearly stipulate exposure to pesticide rather than those that assume pesticide exposure because of farm/agriculture employment is supported.
Childhood brain tumours: associations with parental occupational exposure to solvents
TLDR
The results indicate that parental occupational exposures to solvents may be related to an increased risk of CBT.
Medication use during pregnancy and the risk of childhood cancer in the offspring
TLDR
Analysis of data from a population-based case-control study in Germany indicates a potential influence of some maternal medication during pregnancy on the risk of childhood cancer in the offspring, but no clear picture is seen.
Parental occupational paint exposure and risk of childhood leukemia in the offspring: findings from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium
TLDR
Overall, there is no evidence that parental occupational exposure to paints increases the risk of leukemia in the offspring, but further data on home exposure are needed.
Case–control study of paternal occupation and childhood leukaemia in Great Britain, 1962–2006
TLDR
The results showed some support for a positive association between childhood leukaemia risk and paternal occupation involving social contact and lymphoid leukaemias risk increased with higher paternal occupational social class, with the risk being increased in the higher social classes.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 20 REFERENCES
Parental occupational exposures and risk of childhood cancer.
TLDR
The strongest evidence is for childhood leukemia and paternal exposure to solvents, paints, and employment in motor vehicle-related occupations; and childhood nervous system cancers and paternal Exposure to paints.
Pesticides and childhood cancers.
TLDR
Although increased risk of some childhood cancers in association with pesticide exposure is suggested by multiple studies, methodological limitations common to many studies restrict conclusions; these include indirect exposure classification, small sample size, and potential biases in control selection.
Risk of childhood leukemia and parental self-reported occupational exposure to chemicals, dusts, and fumes: results from pooled analyses of German population-based case-control studies.
TLDR
These studies provide some evidence that parental occupational exposure to certain substances may be associated with cancer risk in offspring; however, more specific studies are needed to identify such substances and the doses that may be hazardous.
Association of childhood cancer with factors related to pregnancy and birth.
TLDR
Overall, only weak associations were identified and the evaluated risk factors operating during the neonatal and prenatal period account at most for only a small proportion of childhood cancers.
Leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in childhood and exposure to pesticides: results of a register-based case-control study in Germany.
TLDR
The data provide some evidence for an increased leukemia risk for children living on farms and for an association between use of household pesticides and risk of childhood leukemia or lymphoma.
Questionnaires for collecting detailed occupational information for community-based case control studies.
TLDR
The organization of a series of questionnaires developed for a case control study of brain tumors is described, which cover a wide variety of exposures including solvents, heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, machining fluids, electromagnetic frequency fields, and many other exposures and, therefore, can be used in other case control studies.
A novel approach to data collection in a case-control study of cancer and occupational exposures.
TLDR
These procedures, which are being successfully implemented in an on-going case-control study of brain tumours, should improve disease risk estimates over those derived from more traditional approaches to exposure assessment.
Assessment of environmental and genetic factors in the etiology of childhood cancers: the Childrens Cancer Group epidemiology program.
TLDR
The Childrens Cancer Group has developed an active program in epidemiologic research, with over a decade of experience demonstrating the feasibility and strengths of conducting analytic Epidemiologic studies within a cooperative clinical trials network.
Atopic disease and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia
TLDR
The data suggest that atopy or a family history of atopy are associated with a reduced risk of childhood ALL, and sensitivity analysis provided some evidence that the protective effect is unlikely to be attributable to this bias in its entirety.
...
...