Bias and the Bar

@article{Smelcer2011BiasAT,
  title={Bias and the Bar},
  author={Susan Navarro Smelcer and Amy Steigerwalt and Richard Vining},
  journal={Political Research Quarterly},
  year={2011},
  volume={65},
  pages={827 - 840}
}
The vetting of potential federal judges by the Standing Committee on Federal Judiciary of the American Bar Association (ABA) is politically controversial. Conservatives allege the Standing Committee is biased against Republican nominees. The ABA and its defenders argue the ABA rates nominees objectively based on their qualifications. The authors investigate whether accusations of liberal bias have merit. They analyze all individuals nominated to the U.S. Courts of Appeals from 1977 to 2008… 

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