Beyond the Zone: Protein Needs of Active Individuals

@article{Lemon2000BeyondTZ,
  title={Beyond the Zone: Protein Needs of Active Individuals},
  author={Peter W R Lemon},
  journal={Journal of the American College of Nutrition},
  year={2000},
  volume={19},
  pages={513S - 521S}
}
  • P. Lemon
  • Published 1 October 2000
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the American College of Nutrition
There has been debate among athletes and nutritionists regarding dietary protein needs for centuries. Although contrary to traditional belief, recent scientific information collected on physically active individuals tends to indicate that regular exercise increases daily protein requirements; however, the precise details remain to be worked out. Based on laboratory measures, daily protein requirements are increased by perhaps as much as 100% vs. recommendations for sedentary individuals (1.6–1… 
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