Beyond rescue: Implementation and evaluation of revised naloxone training for law enforcement officers.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE This study describes the implementation and evaluation of revised opioid overdose prevention and education of naloxone training for law enforcement officers (LEOs) that added: (1) a recovery testimony and (2) the process for deputy-initiated referrals postnaloxone administration. DESIGN AND SAMPLE Evaluation regarding the naloxone training included a pre- and postopioid overdose knowledge surveys (N = 114) and subsequent 1-year postnaloxone training outcomes. RESULTS Pre- and posttest scores for all knowledge outcome measures were statistically significant (p < .001) with favorable comments pertaining to the recovery testimony. Out of 31 individuals who received naloxone, 6 individuals (19.4%) continue to be in treatment or received some treatment services. The most common symptoms reported were unconsciousness/unresponsiveness (40.5%), abnormal breathing patterns (24.3%), and blue lips (16.2%). The majority of the calls (65.6%) were to a residential area, and the time for naloxone revival ranged <1-10 min (M = 3.48; SD = 2.27). CONCLUSION As nearly 20% of individuals sought treatment after a LEO-initiated referral, it is recommended that other agencies consider the referral process into the training. Future research will investigate the impact of the recovery testimony in reducing the stigma of addiction.

DOI: 10.1111/phn.12365

Cite this paper

@article{Dahlem2017BeyondRI, title={Beyond rescue: Implementation and evaluation of revised naloxone training for law enforcement officers.}, author={Chin Hwa Gina Dahlem and Lisa R. King and Glynis Anderson and Ashton Marr and Jonathon Eric Waddell and Marci Scalera}, journal={Public health nursing}, year={2017}, volume={34 6}, pages={516-521} }