Beyond executive functions, creativity skills benefit academic outcomes: Insights from Montessori education

@article{Denervaud2019BeyondEF,
  title={Beyond executive functions, creativity skills benefit academic outcomes: Insights from Montessori education},
  author={Solange Denervaud and Jean-François Knebel and Patric Hagmann and Edouard Gentaz},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2019},
  volume={14}
}
Studies have shown scholastic, creative, and social benefits of Montessori education, benefits that were hypothesized to result from better executive functioning on the part of those so educated. As these previous studies have not reported consistent outcomes supporting this idea, we therefore evaluated scholastic development in a cross-sectional study of kindergarten and elementary school-age students, with an emphasis on the three core executive measures of cognitive flexibility, working… Expand
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