Beyond East and West. From the History of Colonial Medicine to a Social History of Medicine(s) in South Asia

@article{Ernst2007BeyondEA,
  title={Beyond East and West. From the History of Colonial Medicine to a Social History of Medicine(s) in South Asia},
  author={Waltraud Ernst},
  journal={Social History of Medicine},
  year={2007},
  volume={20},
  pages={505-524}
}
  • W. Ernst
  • Published 1 December 2007
  • History
  • Social History of Medicine
Summary.Thisarticlereflectsontheoriesandmethodologiesthathavecharacterisedthefieldofthehistory of colonial medicine over the last couple of decades. It discusses the merits and flaws ofhitherto predominant conceptual paradigms that concerned themselves mainly with issues ofpower, governmentality, the status of modernity and the ‘condition’ of the colonisers and thecolonised. The recent shift in research focus from western or colonial medicine to the multiplicityof indigenous medicines is assessed… 
What is “colonial” about medieval colonial medicine? Iberian health in global context
  • I. McCleery
  • History
    Journal of medieval Iberian studies
  • 2015
TLDR
It is argued that key debates and ideas from that modern field can fruitfully be applied to the Middle Ages, especially for the early empires of Spain and Portugal (mid-fourteenth to mid-sixteenth centuries).
Crossing the Boundaries of ‘Colonial Psychiatry’. Reflections on the Development of Psychiatry in British India, c. 1870–1940
  • W. Ernst
  • History
    Culture, medicine and psychiatry
  • 2011
TLDR
It is suggested here that reference to ‘colonial’ medicine and psychiatry tends to reify the ideology of colonialism and neglect other important dimensions such as the role of international scientific networks and the mental hospital as the locus of care and medicalization.
Colonial Psychiatry in Mid-nineteenth Century India
This article is largely based on historical analysis of an overlooked and unexplored colonial document. The Sir James Clark Enquiry of 1868, conducted by the Government of India, contains rich
Colonial Mission and Imperial Tropical Medicine: Livingstone College, London, 1893-1914
TLDR
Investigating the training of missionaries in the new tropical medicine at Livingstone College, London, and their subsequent experiences throughout Britain's tropical empire finds that the bulk of their work was basic first aid that resembled care in metropolitan Britain.
The Global Menace.
  • S. Hodges
  • Political Science
    Social history of medicine : the journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
  • 2012
TLDR
I have three main concerns: that there is an epistemic collusion between the discourses of universality that inform medical science and global-talk, and that the embrace of the 'global' authorises a turning away from analyses of power in history-writing.
Second Opinion The Global Menace
The history of medicine has gone ‘global.’Why? Can the proliferation of the ‘global’ in our writing be explained away as a product of staying true to our historical subjects’ categories? Or has this
Thinking regionally: narrative, the medical humanities and region
TLDR
The essay surveys how region can be used as a lens of analysis, exploring the various academic approaches to region and their limitations, and argues that regions are dynamic but also unstable as a category of analysis and are often used uncritically by scholars.
Science and modernity : modern medical knowledge and societal rationalization in Malaysia
The focus of this thesis is on the social history of public health and medicine in British Malaya during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. I argue that the introduction of modern medicine,
The Balms of White Grief: Indian Doctors, Vulnerability and Pride in Victoria, 1890–1912
This article uses the 1898 manslaughter trial of two Indian medical practitioners in Victoria, Australia, as a lens to explore the settler colonial politics of medicine. Whereas imperial and colonial
What Was Tropical about Tropical Neurasthenia?: The Utility of the Diagnosis in the Management of British East Africa
  • A. Crozier
  • History
    Journal of the history of medicine and allied sciences
  • 2009
TLDR
This article shows that tropical neurasthenia remained a popular diagnosis in East Africa not only because it dovetailed with prevalent ideas of colonial acclimatization, but also because it was a practically useful tool in the management and regulation of colonial personnel.
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 55 REFERENCES
Colonial Psychiatry, Magic and Religion. The Case of Mesmerism in British India
  • W. Ernst
  • Medicine
    History of psychiatry
  • 2004
TLDR
The case of mesmerism shows that awareness both of the domineering power of a gradually emerging medical ‘imagined’ mainstream and an analysis of the complex challenges faced by heterodoxy facilitate a more critical understanding of the development of colonial medicine and psychiatry in the East as well as, arguably, of medicine and Psychiatry in Britain itself.
Structuring Plurality: Locality, Caste, Class and Ethnicity in Nineteenth- Century Bengali Dispensaries
Dispensaries in colonial South Asia have received scant attention in the historiography on colonial medicine in India. Those who have touched upon them have remarked on the pluralism and hybridity of
Historiographical traditions and modern imperatives for the restoration of global history
This essay has been written to serve as a prolegomenon for a new journal in Global History. It opens with a brief depiction of the two major approaches to the field (through connexions and
Bodies and Borders: A New Cultural History of Medicine
  • G. Brieger
  • Medicine
    Perspectives in biology and medicine
  • 2004
TLDR
There is a question about whether the history of medicine has lost the appeal to one of its core constituencies: medical students and physicians, and some of the new changes in medical history as in medicine need to be welcomed.
Can the Subaltern Speak
Some of the most radical criticism coming out of the West today is the result of an interested desire to conserve the subject of the West, or the West as Subject. The theory of pluralized
Going Beyond Elite Medical Traditions: The Case of Chandshi
TLDR
It is suggested that the search for status and legitimacy may have, in the past, led physicians of this system to speak of themselves as ayurvedic rather than Chandshipractitioners.
European madness and gender in nineteenth-century British India.
  • W. Ernst
  • History, Economics
    Social history of medicine : the journal of the Society for the Social History of Medicine
  • 1996
TLDR
Whether gender was a linchpin in the construction of Europeans' mental health in nineteenth-century British India is explored to explore.
Asylums, families and the state.
TLDR
The author offers some concrete examples of the process of institutionalisation and suggests some refinements to the thesis outlined by Ignatieff in relation to one particular institution: the lunatic asylum.
Patterns of Medical Culture in Colonial Bengal, 1835-1880
  • C. Hochmuth
  • Medicine
    Bulletin of the history of medicine
  • 2006
TLDR
This paper examines the context of education in scientific medicine through a number of medical texts written by indigenous authors; it also analyzes the in-patient and out-patient work of indigenous practitioners in government dispensaries by means of yearly dispensary reports.
The Location of Culture
Acknowledgements, Introduction: Locations of culture, 1. The commitment to theory, 2. Interrogating identity: Frantz Fanon and the postcolonial prerogative, 3. The other question: Stereotype,
...
1
2
3
4
5
...