Beyond ‘substantial equivalence’

@article{Millstone1999BeyondE,
  title={Beyond ‘substantial equivalence’},
  author={Erik Paul Millstone and Eric Brunner and Sue Mayer},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1999},
  volume={401},
  pages={525-526}
}
Showing that a genetically modified food is chemically similar to its natural counterpart is not adequate evidence that it is safe for human consumption. 

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