Beware of bats, beware of birds: the auditory responses of eared moths to bat and bird predation

@article{Jacobs2008BewareOB,
  title={Beware of bats, beware of birds: the auditory responses of eared moths to bat and bird predation},
  author={David S. Jacobs and John M Ratcliffe and James H. Fullard},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology},
  year={2008},
  volume={19},
  pages={1333-1342}
}
The allotonic frequency hypothesis (AFH) proposes that the preponderance of moths in the diets of some bats (e.g., Rhinolophidae) is the result of these bats echolocating at allotonic frequencies, that is, outside of the typical hearing range of most moths (ca., 20--60 kHz). The broader hearing range of African moths (5--110 kHz) suggests that their ears may function at frequencies usually considered allotonic. We investigated 1) whether moth ears were functionally audible to the Cape horseshoe… Expand

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