Between the Worlds. Rock Art, Landscape and Shamanism in Subneolithic Finland

@article{Lahelma2005BetweenTW,
  title={Between the Worlds. Rock Art, Landscape and Shamanism in Subneolithic Finland},
  author={Antti Lahelma},
  journal={Norwegian Archaeological Review},
  year={2005},
  volume={38},
  pages={29 - 47}
}
  • Antti Lahelma
  • Published 1 June 2005
  • Art
  • Norwegian Archaeological Review
The Finnish rock paintings, dated to ca. 5000–1500 cal. BC, form a significant but so far relatively poorly known body of rock art in Northern Europe. The paintings are made with red ochre on steep cliffs rising at lakeshores and typically feature images of elks, men, boats, handprints and geometric designs. Traditional interpretations associate the art with shamanism. This interpretation, it is argued, finds additional support from the presence of a group of images that appear to portray… 
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