Between Economics and Ecology: Some Historical and Philosophical Considerations for Modelers of Natural Capital

@article{Foster2003BetweenEA,
  title={Between Economics and Ecology: Some Historical and Philosophical Considerations for Modelers of Natural Capital},
  author={Jay Foster},
  journal={Environmental Monitoring and Assessment},
  year={2003},
  volume={86},
  pages={63-74}
}
  • Jay Foster
  • Published 1 July 2003
  • Economics
  • Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
Natural capital models attempt to remediate the relationship between economics and ecology either by conjoining models and theories from each discipline or by finding a type of phenomena that can be meaningfully measured by both fields. The developmentof a widely accepted model which integrates economics and ecologyhas eluded researchers since the early 1970s. This paper offers an historical and philosophical perspective on some of the conceptual problems or obstacles that hinder the… 
Environmental entrepreneurship: The sustainability challenge
Objectives: The past decade has seen an upsurge in academic, practitioner and policy interest in environmental entrepreneurship (e.g. Kirkwood and Walton, 2010a, b; Walley et al, 2010), as well as a
Environmental entrepreneurship : The sustainability challenge
Objectives: The past decade has seen an upsurge in academic, practitioner and policy interest in environmental entrepreneurship (e.g. Kirkwood and Walton, 2010a, b; Walley et al, 2010), as well as a

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 14 REFERENCES
Nature's Economy: A History of Ecological Ideas
Preface Part I. Two Road Diverged: Ecology in the Eighteenth Century: 1. Science in Arcadia 2. The empire of reason Part II. The Subversive Science: Thoreau's Romantic Ecology: 3. A naturalist in
Natural Capital and Sustainable Development
Abstract: A minimum necessary condition for sustainability is the maintenance of the total natural capital stock at or above the current level. While a lower stock of natural capital may be
We Have Never Been Modern
What makes us modern? This is a classic question in philosophy as well as in political science. However it is often raised without including science and technology in its definition. The argument of
Diminishing returns and Malthus's first essay on population: theory and application.
TLDR
It is argued that Malthus's famous geometrical and arithmetical ratios do not necessarily imply diminishing returns and his later land-scarcity based growth model involving a declining path of real wages in consequence of a decelerating rate of growth of labour demand is found.
Total energy costs in ecosystems.
  • B. Hannon
  • Environmental Science
    Journal of theoretical biology
  • 1979
The Limits to Growth
In spite of the preliminary state of our work, we believe it is important to publish the model and our findings now. (...) We feel that the model described here is already sufficiently developed to
...
...